Rev Artemas Bullard DD  ‎(I5990)‎
Prefix: Rev
Given Names: Artemas
Surname: Bullard
Suffix: DD

Gender: MaleMale
      

Birth: 3 June 1802 33 24 Northbridge, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
Death: 1 November 1855 ‎(Age 53)‎ Missouri, USA

Personal Facts and Details
Birth 3 June 1802 33 24 Northbridge, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA


Show Details Source: New England Families: Genealogical and Memorial, Volume 2
Publication: Lewis Historical Publishing Company New York 1913
Citation Details:  Pg. 932

Education Seminary Andover, Essex, Massachusetts, USA

Agency: Theological Seminary

Show Details Source: Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 748

Education College Prep Auburn, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA

Agency: studied with Rev. Dr. Enoch Pond

Show Details Source: Biographical Record of the Alumni of Amherst College During Its First Half Century, Volume 1
Publication: Amherst, MA 1883
Citation Details:  Pg. 27

Occupation Minister Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA

Agency: Congregational Church ‎(United Church of Christ)‎

Show Details Source: Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 748

Church Membership about 1819 ‎(Age 16)‎ Sutton, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA


Show Details Source: Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 748

GraduationCollege
1826 ‎(Age 23)‎ Amherst, Hampshire, Massachusetts, USA

Agency: Amherst College

Show Details Source: Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 748

Occupation between 1828 and 1832 ‎(Age 25)‎ General agency and secretariship

Agency: Massachusetts Sabath School Union

Show Details Source: Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 748

Show Details Source: Biographical Record of the Alumni of Amherst College During Its First Half Century, Volume 1
Publication: Amherst, MA 1883
Citation Details:  Pg. 27

Occupation 10 March 1828 ‎(Age 25)‎ Report presenter Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA

Agency: American Sabbath School Union

Show Details Source: ProQuest - American Periodicals

Citation Details:  Christian Watchman
  Date of entry in original source: 14 March 1828
  Text: Mr. Artemas Bullard, an Agent of the American Sabbath School Union, made an interesting and animated address on the general influence of Sabbath Schools, and the duties of Sabbath School teacher. "It is cheering," said Mr. Bullard, "to see all the benevolent institutions of our day united in their influence to extend the triumphs of the Cross, and execute the glorious plans of a merciful God for saving a lost world. Does the Bible Society wish to raise up a host of faithful ambassadors to the destitute in our own land, and heralds of salvation to the perishing heathen? Sabbath Schools have been, and are now, successfully labouring for the conversion of children and youth, that there may be many more pious young me prepared to receive an education, to qualify them for that holy office. In one of the English Reports, it is said, that nineteen twentieths of those who have gone to heathen lands, became pious in Sabbath Schools! Think of this! and of the five or six hundred millions who will be in eternity, when this generation is in the grave. But I need not speak of the intellectual, moral, or religious influence of Sabbath Schools. You all realize, in a greater or less degree, the intellectual influence that must be exerted by the five million publications which the Sabbath School Union has, in less than four years, sent into different parts of the United States. You all know that many precious youth have been guarded against the enticing allurements of the most degrading vices, by Sabbath School. You have heard, too, of many revivals of religion, which have commenced in these nurseries of early piety, that have brought many hardened parents and grandparents into the fold of Jesus." Mr. Bullard ‎[sic]‎ then proceeded to enumerate some of the responsible duties that devolve on Sabbath School Teachers.--"First, Increase the number of scholars; this can be easily be done. In Andover, where, a year last summer, there were only 225 scholars, in consequence of the teachers visiting every family, and reporting to the Superintendent the name of every child of suitable age to attend a Sabbath School, there have been more than six hundred the last season. In another place, by a little effort, a week last Sabbath, after the services of the sanctuary, more than two hundred over fourteen years of age, organized themselves into classes, and chose their teachers. The second duty of teachers is, to obtain the affection of their classes. I should tremble to meet a child in eternity who had left my class, and the Sabbath School, unless I had made every possible exertion to win its affections, and prepare it for heaven. The last duty I would this evening urge upon you, is that of labouring diligently for the immediate salvation of the souls of your scholars. Here is an alarming deficiency among teachers. Many feel that, if they store the mind with truth; and keep children from mischief, they have nothing more to do, but wait and see if the seed thus sown, will not, some twenty or thirty years hence, spring up and bear fruit unto holiness; they think their children too young to be renewed in heart; but we have indubitable evidence that children are converted at the early age of five or six; I have seen a child of this age, within a few weeks, who has frequently during the past summer, awakened ‎[sic]‎ his parents in the night, weeping because he had such a wicked heart; nor would he be pacified, till they had knelt by his side, and prayed to God to give him a new one. He now gives good evidence of having passed from death to life. Indeed childhood and youth is the best possible time in the life of man, to make efforts for the salvation of the soul; FEEL this every Sabbath; feel as you would if you know that Jesus was present, witnessing the manner in which instruction is given, and the fervency with which your prayers are offered on the Sabbath, and during the week; remember that you must meet Him and your children at the judgment. And Oh! let me entreat you to spare yourselves the remorse that must take hold upon your souls, if you should there find that they perish though your neglect. Let teachers without an interest in the Redeemer, tremble lest they sink under the accumulated guilt of destroying themselves, and their scholars; the way to avoid this, is by becoming devoted, faithful Christians; for if you leave your classes, you are then to give an account for the opportunity you have had of saving their souls. Let all then resolve that they will consecrate themselves to their Saviour, and pray and labour earnestly for the immediate conversion of their scholars."

Pastor's License May 1828 ‎(Age 25)‎ Worcester Association ‎(Congretational Church)‎ Worcester, Massachusetts, USA


Show Details Source: Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 748

Marriage 2 June 1829 ‎(Age 26)‎ Anne Tuttle - Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA


Show Details Source: Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 750

Occupation after 1830 ‎(Age 27)‎ Missionary Illinois, USA

Agency: Congregational Church ‎(United Church of Christ)‎

Show Details Source: Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 748

Civic Membership Massachusetts Sabbath School Society life member


Show Details Source: First through Tenth Annual Reports of the Massachusetts Sabbath School Society
Publication: 1833-1842 Boston
Citation Details:  Pg. 75

Civic Membership American Seaman's Friend Society life member


Show Details Source: Seventeenth through Thirty-second Annual Reports of the American Seaman's Friend Society
Publication: 1845-1860
Citation Details:  Pg. 23

Number of Children 7 - five sons and two daughters


Show Details Source: Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 750

Ordination 20 April 1831 ‎(Age 28)‎ Andover, Essex, Massachusetts, USA

Agency: Congregational Church ‎(Andover Association)‎

Show Details Source: Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 748

Missionary Organization between 1832 and July 1838 ‎(Age 29)‎ Secretary of the American Board for the Valley of Mississippi Cincinnati, Hamilton, Ohio, USA


Show Details Source: Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 748-749

Show Details Source: A Genealogical Sketch of Dr. Artemas Bullard of Sutton, and His Descendants
Publication: Lucius P. Goddard 425 Main Street Worcester, MA 1878
Citation Details:  Pg. 14

Show Details Source: Biographical Record of the Alumni of Amherst College During Its First Half Century, Volume 1
Publication: Amherst, MA 1883
Citation Details:  Pg. 27

Show Details Source: Report of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, Volumes 53-59
Publication: 1838-1842
Citation Details:  1838, Pg. 51

Civic Organization between 1838 and 1840 ‎(Age 35)‎ American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions honorary member


Show Details Source: Report of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, Volumes 53-59
Publication: 1838-1842
Citation Details:  1838, Pg. 11; 1840, Pg. 11

Occupation between June 1838 and 1855 ‎(Age 35)‎ Pastor St. Louis, Missouri, USA

Agency: First Presbyterian Church

Show Details Source: Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 749

Show Details Source: A Genealogical Sketch of Dr. Artemas Bullard of Sutton, and His Descendants
Publication: Lucius P. Goddard 425 Main Street Worcester, MA 1878
Citation Details:  Pg. 14
  Text: pastor of the first Presbyterian church in St. Louis

Show Details Source: Biographical Record of the Alumni of Amherst College During Its First Half Century, Volume 1
Publication: Amherst, MA 1883
Citation Details:  Pg. 27

Occupation 1839 ‎(Age 36)‎ Author of Published Sermon - A Sermon Preached in the First Presbyterian Church of Saint Louis, Missouri on the First Sabbath of 1839 St. Louis, Missouri, USA


Show Details Note: http://books.google.com/books?id=eGwtAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=bullard&lr=&as_brr=4&ei=WrISTJDcGInAywT7uvTPCg&cd=51#v=twopage&q&f=false
Churchill & Ramsey, Printers
St. Louis
1839

Civic Organization between 1840 and 1855 ‎(Age 37)‎ American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions corporate member


Show Details Source: Report of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, Volumes 53-59
Publication: 1838-1842
Citation Details:  1840, Pg. 5; 1841, Pg. 5 1842, Pg. 6

Show Details Source: Report of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, Volumes 49-51
Publication: 1858-1860
Citation Details:  Pg. 172

GraduationDoctor of Divinity
1841 ‎(Age 38)‎ Philadelphia, Marion, Missouri, USA

Agency: Marion College

Show Details Source: Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 749

Show Details Source: Biographical Record of the Alumni of Amherst College During Its First Half Century, Volume 1
Publication: Amherst, MA 1883
Citation Details:  Pg. 27

Appointed Position 1850 ‎(Age 47)‎ World's Peace Convention delegate for Missouri Frankfurt am Main, Darmstadt, Hesse, Germany


Show Details Source: A Genealogical Sketch of Dr. Artemas Bullard of Sutton, and His Descendants
Publication: Lucius P. Goddard 425 Main Street Worcester, MA 1878
Citation Details:  Pg. 14

Show Details Source: Biographical Record of the Alumni of Amherst College During Its First Half Century, Volume 1
Publication: Amherst, MA 1883
Citation Details:  Pg. 27

Occupation between 5 October 1853 and 7 October 1853 ‎(Age 51)‎ Convention delegate and presenter Cincinnati, Hamilton, Ohio, USA

Agency: American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions

Show Details Source: ProQuest Historical Newspapers - The New York Times

  Date of entry in original source: 12 October 1853
  Text: 06 OCT 1853
Rev. Dr. BULLARD presented a report on the China Mission.

‎[...]‎

06 OCT 1853
Rev. Dr. BULLARD said that, while there was so much rejoicing at the success of the Board, he was much depressed. He had viewed with intense interest the progress of the country. The thought that oppressed him was, that there was such an energy and activity in worldly business, while the American Board progressed so slowly. To meet the demand the next year, we need a million of dollars, and a hundred young men to send out. A young man connected with his church, a few years since had not a dollar of his own, but now he is connected with a firm whose monthly income is a million. He called on him a short time since for a subscription to a college, and he stated that he was then under obligations for contributions to the amount of fifty thousand dollars, and could only give two thousand then, but before the end of the year would contribute ten thousand for the same object.

Death 1 November 1855 ‎(Age 53)‎ Missouri, USA

Cause of death: Injuries sustained in bridge collapse

Show Details Source: Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 750
  Text: Dr. Bullard's death was identified with a scene of deep tragical interest. The Pacific Rail Road, in which St. Louis was deeply interested, was to be opened, on Thursday, November 1, 1855, to Jefferson City, the capital of the State. The occasion was a most exciting one. A long train of cars, bearing the Directors of the road and a large number of highly respectable citizens, set out on the excursion. The occasion was graced by military array, and martial music, and whatever else could render the scene imposing and joyous. In passing the bridge across the Gasconade, eighty-eight miles from St. Louis, and thirty-seven from Jefferson City, the structure gave way, and six cars, densely filled with human beings, fell one upon another, to the beach, thirty feet below. Twenty-nine persons were instantly killed, and among them Dr. Billiard. His remains did not reach St. Louis till Saturday night; and then they were taken, not to his residence, but to the church, where, on Monday, the Funeral solemnities took place. The Sabbath previous, he had administered the Lord's Supper, from the very table on which his lifeless body then lay. The church had been dedicated just two weeks before, but he had never preached in it. His Funeral Sermon was preached by the Rev, Timothy Hill, of Fairmount Church, St. Louis.

Show Details Source: ProQuest Historical Newspapers - The New York Times

  Date of entry in original source: 5 November 1855
  Text: The Pacific Railroad Accident.
Full Particulars of the Disaster.
List of the Killed and Wounded.

From the St. Louis Republican, Nov. 2.

The magnificent train of cards which left our city yesterday morning, on an excursion to Jefferson City, to celebrate the opening of the Pacific Railroad to that place, is now a mass of ruins, and infinitely worse than this, many of the noble hearts that participated in the pride of the occasion, are now stilled in death.

The train consisting of fourteen cars, left the depot on Seventh-street, at 9 o'clock, crowded with invited guests, a half hour after the time advertised. by the time it reached Hermann this delay was fully recovered, thus showing the good conditino ot the track. After leaving Hermann, the train proceeded with good speed, and without the least difficulty until it reached the Gasconade, when one of the most disastrous accidents occurred which has yet thrown this city inot mourning.

The bridge across that stream gave way, and ten of the cars were prcipitated a distance of twenty-five or thirty feet. The locomotive from all appearances, had reached the edge of the first pier, when the structure gave way, and in falling reversed its position entirely, the frotn turnign to the east, and the wheels upward. On the locomotive at the time, were the President, Mr. H.E. BRIDGE, Mr. O'SULLIVAN, the Chief Engineer of the road, and and additional number of employees ‎[sic]‎.

Mr. BRIDGE, it is supposed, is the only one saved of the individuals named. An hour after this disaster, voices from beneath the wreck of the locomotive were heard asking for asistance, and when we left eh scene of the disaster active efforst were making to relieve the sufferers. It is possible--nay, it is to be hoped probably, that some of these unfortunates may have been rescued.

The road enters the bridge with a curve, and this circumstance, perhaps, prevented the disaster from being more fatal, as the cars thereby wre diverted, and thus prevented from falling directly in a general melee. Enough of injury, however, weas accomplished. The baggage car, next the engine, went down, to use the expression of one who as in it, "extremely easy," without ‎[sic]‎ causing any serious casualty. The first and second passenger cars followed, and in these several were killed, and a great number more or less mangled.

In the third car, one or two were killed, only. This car, although in a dangerous position, and almost entirely demolishsed, was less fatal to life and limb. In the fourth and fifth cards a great many were fatally injured, and several instantly killed. The balance of the train followed swiftly on their fatal errand, and the loss of life, with contusions more of less severe, was dreadful.

Some of the cars plunged on those beneath them with their ponderous wheels, and crushed or maimed the unfortunate persons below. Others hung upon the cliff in a perpendicular position, and two or three turned bottom upward down the grade. One one--the extreme rear car--maintained its position on the rail.

The following is a list of the killed and wounded, as far as could be ascertained, when the train, detailed for the purpose of bringing the injured to this city, left the scene of the disaster. Many others, less seriously hurt, were in the cars, but it is not necessary to name them.

DEAD.--‎[...]‎ Rev. Dr. Bullard

‎[...]‎

Doctors McDOWELL and McPHERSON were fortunately among the guests, and gave their best skill to the alleviation of the wretched sufferers. It was impossible, however, for them to apply bandages and reset limbs, under the circumstances. The accident occurred where no houses are to be seen--in a wild forest--and during the time a heavy storm or rain, accompanied by lightning and thunder, of the most vivid description, fell without intermission.

Couriers were dispatched forthwith to Hermann for another train, and in an hour, or less, the wounded were in comfortable cars on their way to the city. It was an awful spectacle--one that might appall ‎[sic]‎ the stoutest heart; the dead and dying lying without shelter, save that afforded by the hand of friendship or philanthropy, exposed to a pitiless storm, and the wounded groaning from amid the ruins, and supplicating the succor of the more fortunate.

The return cars reached the depots on Fourteenth and Seventh streets about 11 1/2 o'clock. They were filled with the wounded, and although their accommodations were limited, we heard not a single expression of dissatisfaction. Many in that melancholy train were fatally injured, and many suffered with intense agony; but they bore up like men, and exhibited the highest degree of fortitude.

We suppose that not one man out of ten escaped without injury to a greater or less extent, and although this may be termed a sever casualty of no ordinary character, yet it is wonderful how so many escaped with life.

Judge WELLS, of the District Court of the United States, was along with his lady. The Judge received a slight contusion or bruise, and Mrs. W. escaped entirely. One other lady was also in the company, and she, too, escaped.

Thus has happened a frightful accident--one more disastrous than it has been our sad duty to announce for a while. The city is in mourning for many of its most worthy citizens, and domestic grief will require long years to heal the wounds it has inflicted.

Funeral 5 November 1855 ‎(4 days after death)‎ St. Louis, Missouri, USA

Address:
Officiated by Rev. Timothy Hill of Fairmount Church



Show Details Source: Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 750

Last Change 15 June 2010 - 19:58:00 - by: susan
View Details for ...

Parents Family  (F1924)
Artemas Bullard MD
1768 - 1842
Lucy White
1778 - 1869
Maria Waters Bullard
1800 -
(Birth) Rev Artemas Bullard DD
1802 - 1855
Rev Asa Bullard
1804 - 1888
Joseph Bullard
1806 - 1872
Lucy Ann Bullard
1809 - 1898
Rev Ebenezer Waters Bullard
1809 -
Eunice White Bullard
1812 -
Talbut Bullard MD
1815 - 1863
Jesse Mason Bullard MD
1818 - 1851
Oliver Crosby "O.C." Bullard
1822 - 1890

Immediate Family  (F2178)
Anne Tuttle
-
Artemas Everett Bullard
1830 - 1836
Anna Maria Bullard
1832 - 1833
Thomas Green Fessenden Bullard
1834 - 1838
Robert Leighton Bullard
1837 - 1848
Rev Henry Bullard
1839 -
Anna Elizabeth Bullard
1842 - 1848
Edward Payson Bullard
1845 - 1848


Notes

Note
FROM THE REV. TIMOTHY HILL.

St. Louis, April 29, 1857.

Dear Sir: I will endeavour, according to your request, to briefly give my impressions of the late Dr. Bullard,—a man I knew well and greatly loved.

My acquaintance with him began in the summer of 1845. I was then a student in the Union Theological Seminary in New York, and he was on his way through the prominent places of the East, and visiting the Theological Seminaries, for the double purpose of raising a fund for church erection in Missouri, and of inducing young men about to enter the ministry to select this State as the field of their future labours.

The interview in the Seminary was very short, but it led to my coming to Missouri; and the acquaintance, thus formed, afterwards ripened into a friendship, which continued with growing strength until his death. I knew him intimately. No man's death has ever been so great a grief to me.

Artemas Bullard was a remarkable man. His character, his habits of life, and his achievements, were of a description that have seldom been seen, and will not be likely soon to be reproduced.

In person he was tall and slender, but well formed, .with a countenance expressive of decision and energy combined with benevolence. For some years previous to his death, his hair was nearly white, and his appearance indicated greater age than he possessed. Acquaintances of the late President Jackson frequently said that he bore a strong resemblance to that celebrated man.

Dr. Bullard possessed a rare combination of superior qualities. His mental powers were none of them of a low order, and in some he was seldom equalled. His perceptions were uncommonly quick, and his power to avail himself of bis resources at any time, remarkably great. His was eminently a constructive mind. He could lay plans, and see the time and manner for their execution with greater cleverness than any other man with whom I was ever acquainted. He was no visionary; his plans, though they might seem hopeless to others, seldom failed, and were sometimes executed in the face of opposing influences, utterly insuperable to less active and courageous men.

There was an unconquerable determination to surmount all obstacles that opposed bis favourite schemes, and he had unusual power to infuse his own hopeful spirit into the minds of those whom he wished to interest.

He was frank in his manner, open hearted and sincere, social and benevolent, in a high degree. His very want of disguise sometimes led less ingenuous minds to misapprehend him, and look for something never to be found, concealed under an exterior of frankness. Fond of society, possessed of no inconsiderable degree of shrewdness and pleasantry, mingling with all classes of men, from children, of whom he was a great lover, to those of the most cultivated minds in the highest stations of life, he was a most entertaining associate, and had an ability for usefulness, wherever he might be, that few men possess. He would hold the attention of a congregation of pioneers on the frontier, reprove the profaneness of a wild group of California emigrants on a steamboat, and draw tears to their eyes by tender allusions to home and the sanctuary they had left behind, or debate with the congregated wisdom of the General Assembly, with equal ease and success. He was a man of immense energy—the amount of labour he performed was almost incalculable. He corresponded, I had almost said, with every body. He knew accurately the situation of every church of his own denomination in the State, and was well posted in the general affairs of the Church in the land and world. Most of the churches in this State can remember a visit of his, as the time when they were greatly encouraged—incited to build a new house of worship, or to sustain or care for a pastor. He loved to cheer the younger ministers, whose fields of labour were remote or toilsome—a letter ; a box of clothing furnished by some Benevolent Society, but its destination marked by the Doctor, or associated with him; or a timely visit,—will be a cherished recollection of many a weary labourer in this State. It has been said of him by one who knew him well, but with whom he was not a favourite,—" There was no man who would go farther, and do more, for a friend than he."

His acquaintance with books was not extensive, nor minutely critical ; but his knowledge of all the practical questions of the day was never deficient. These he had studied until his mind was made up, and he could sustain his opinions by close and well digested arguments. Dr. Bullard's first clerical labours were as an Agent,—having much to do with collecting funds for purposes of benevolence; and this fact undoubtedly shaped, in no inconsiderable degree, his whole subsequent life.

He was singularly successful 111 any department where money was wanted for benevolent objects. It may not be amiss here to relate an anecdote which one of his friends told him, much to his amusement. It was said that two young men were walking together, and, as they passed the door of an artist, saw there a well-executed photograph of Dr. Bullard. As they came to it, one said to the other,—"See, here is a most excellent likeness of Dr. Bullard." His friend answered,—" Come away, come away; he'll have five dollars out of you for a church before you know it." But if he urged others to acts of benevolence, he set the example, and gave, according to his means, liberally, especially to churches in Missouri.

His tragic death is well known, and it is needless for me to describe it here. But it is proper perhaps to state that his purpose, in going on that excursion, which had so terrible a termination, was not merely for recreation, but for benevolence. I saw him a day or two before, and he remarked to me that he had hesitated about going,—that he had no fondness for such gatherings, but thought it might afford him an opportunity to do something for Webster College,—ac institution of which he was the originator, and the strongest friend. The subscription book of that institution was found in his pocket after his death,—wet and soiled by the tempest which beat so piteously at that terrible hour.

He was in excellent spirits on the day of his death. His beautiful church, for which he had laboured untiringly, but in which he had only administered the Communion service, was completed; all his enterprises were prospering; and he hoped, and apparently with good reason, for a long life of usefulness. The last word remembered of him was a mirthful remark to one of his travelling friends. Probably he passed from one world to another in the twinkling of an eye. He fell in the full vigour of life, with his armour on.

His memory will long be cherished with a deep and affectionate interest. His work was a peculiar one, and he did it well.

With great regard,

I remain yours truly,

T. HILL.

Show Details Source: Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 750-752


Note
FROM THE REV. THOMAS BRAINERD, D. D.

Philadelphia, June 24, 1857.

Dear Sir: My first knowledge of the late Dr. Bullard was while he was Agent of the Massachusetts Sabbath School Union,—during my student days at the Andover Theological Seminary. In 1831, I settled in Cincinnati. In 1832, Mr. Bullard came there as Agent of the " American Board for the Valley of the Mississippi " For four years he acted in this Agency, while I conducted the " Cincinnati Journal." Ecclesiastically and socially we were thrown together in constant and confidential intercourse. I think I knew him well; but still feel doubtful of my ability to sketch his character within the limits of a short letter.

His great attribute, as a man and a minister, was energy. In executive power, within the range of his objects, he has hardly left an equal in our Church. In his enterprises for Sabbath schools, missions, church building, college founding, 4c., I am not aware that he ever failed. When he had once taken up an enterprise, he identified with it his whole being. His time, travel, credit, pen, tongue, purse, and prayers, were all put in requisition. He was dismayed by no obstacles, hindered by no objections, turned aside by no attractions, until the matter was accomplished. Where he began, he finished.

For these enterprises he had remarkable qualifications. Physically, he was able to endure almost any amount of labour. He had a temperament at once ardent and wary;—blending qualities not often found in the same person. As a thinker, he was ready and clear. His personal appearance was commanding and attractive; his voice clear, penetrating and full; his manners social, kind and dignified; his public speaking, fluent, simple, fervid and effective. He was a good scholar—but scholarship with him was not an end, but a means. Truth itself, with him, was mainly valued for its uses. He cared little for scientific or theological speculations. With him, every thing, even to his friendships and recreations, his readings and his sermons, was practical. He had great confidence in God and the Gospel; great conscientiousness in the use of his time and powers; great reliance on the excellence and feasibility of his own plans; great personal and moral courage, by which he moved over friend or foe—over dangers or difficulties, to reach his benevolent ends; great adhesiveness, by which he clung to the work until it was done. Of course he was a man of mark, as to power and efficiency. Those who could appreciate him, and aid him, he loved intensely; but more timid, and less energetic and devoted, spirits, he was liable to regard with indifference and distaste. He cared little for mere style, form or manner. He looked for results; and his brethren who failed in efficiency here, he cared little to please. Such a sanctified Napoleon in the Church,—such a moving spirit in the ministry,—naturally had devoted friends and resolute opponents.

I could give facts to illustrate all I have said, but I will only recall a few incidents to the memory of his friends.

When he entered the West, as Agent of the American Board, the whole field lay waste. He formed an " Auxiliary Society of the Valley of the Mississippi;" attracted attention to it, and made it effective; reprinted the Missionary Herald at Cincinnati, and circulated it largely; got up Western Anniversaries fully attended; republished all the past Reports of the Board, and made them tell, in combining and concentrating the affections of thousands on the cause of missions. At two periods, he returned from his long journeys, to find an only child dead. " He buried their bodies and went" on with his work. Repeatedly, when he determined a church should be erected in a desolate district, he was so confident of success, that he pledged his own credit and pushed on the work. In the winter of 1834, he had been labouring in a revival in Lexington, Ky. Obliged to leave for a time, he promised to return and bring me with him. On his way to Cincinnati, his horse fell, threw Mr. Bullard and disabled himself. He hired another, and reaching Cincinnati, persuaded me to go back with him,—a journey of eighty miles in the deep mud of December. We started, and on the way took up his lame horse; and by wading in slush from early dawn till nine o'clock at evening, in two days and a half, reached Lexington; where we laboured two weeks for the Rev. Doctors Hall and Davidson. This is a specimen of the manner in which, at that early day, he was accustomed to push through obstacles.

In the winter of 1835, very much under his promptings, we made another excursion to Lexington in the stage. Our company consisted of Rev. Dr. Lyman Beecher, his daughter Catharine, the Rev. Dr. Storrs, Rev. Dr. Cogswell, Rev E. N. Kirk, Rev. Mr. Mahan, Rev. Dr. Bullard, and myself. The road was terrible. And in returning, though we left Lexington Friday noon, it was gray dawn on Sunday morning when we arrived at Cincinnati. About twelve o'clock on Friday night, we found our stage in a drenching rain and deep mud, half capsized in a desolate spot. By hanging Miss Beecher up like a locust, on a rail fence, and lifting at the stage, we righted it. We crept on through Saturday until about nine o'clock at evening, twenty miles out from Cincinnati, when we slid again into a ditch and stuck fast. Dr. Beecher lost both shoes in the mud. By a liberal use of rails, we righted the stage, but the driver became panicstricken, and refused to go on. Dr. Bullard told him he would sit with him and share the responsibility. He did so; encouraged the driver, and brought us in at break of day. This is a specimen of his energy and courage.

On a certain occasion, Dr. Bullard was impressed with the conviction that a man somewhat distinguished, and occupying a prominent position, was neglecting his congregation by residing at a distance from them on his farm, to which he seemed to give more attention than to his people. He deliberately administered a decided reproof. It brought the minister back to his duty to his people; but I am sorry to add, alienated him ever after from Dr. Bullard. I always admired the conscientious fidelity and boldness of Dr. Bullard, in admonishing his brethren, but could not always commend the delicacy and gentleness of his spirit in such matters. What he gave, however, he would take without offence. Advancing

Vol. IV. 95

years, while they ripened his judgment, wrought no abatement of his enthusiasm and energy. A short time before he died, I received a letter from him, in which he manifested a willingness to embark in an enterprise, new, difficult and laborious. Speaking of ministerial education in connection with our General Assembly, ho says,—" Had Providence permitted, I should have entered the important field you opened to me with a will, and laboured in it with a zeal and enthusiasm I never exhibited before. There is no place on earth I prefer to it; none so important." Thus he wrote, Nov. 13th, 1854.

I have given facts sufficient to justify what I have said of the characteristics of Dr. Milliard. He passed from earth by a death of violence, at the period of his greatest strength and highest usefulness. But he lived long enough to have an influence decided, wide-spread and enduring, on that Great Valley of the West, to whose religious culture he had consecrated his energies.

Yours truly.

THOMAS BRAINERD.

Show Details Source: Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 752-754

Occupation http://books.google.com/books?id=eGwtAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=bullard&lr=&as_brr=4&ei=WrISTJDcGInAywT7uvTPCg&cd=51#v=twopage&q&f=false

Churchill & Ramsey, Printers
St. Louis
1839

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Sources

Source
New England Families: Genealogical and Memorial, Volume 2
Publication: Lewis Historical Publishing Company New York 1913
Citation Details:  Pg. 932
Birth New England Families: Genealogical and Memorial, Volume 2
Publication: Lewis Historical Publishing Company New York 1913
Citation Details:  Pg. 932
Education Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 748
Education Biographical Record of the Alumni of Amherst College During Its First Half Century, Volume 1
Publication: Amherst, MA 1883
Citation Details:  Pg. 27
Occupation Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 748
Event Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 748
Graduation Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 748
Occupation Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 748
Occupation Biographical Record of the Alumni of Amherst College During Its First Half Century, Volume 1
Publication: Amherst, MA 1883
Citation Details:  Pg. 27
Occupation ProQuest - American Periodicals
Citation Details:  Christian Watchman
  Date of entry in original source: 14 March 1828
  Text: Mr. Artemas Bullard, an Agent of the American Sabbath School Union, made an interesting and animated address on the general influence of Sabbath Schools, and the duties of Sabbath School teacher. "It is cheering," said Mr. Bullard, "to see all the benevolent institutions of our day united in their influence to extend the triumphs of the Cross, and execute the glorious plans of a merciful God for saving a lost world. Does the Bible Society wish to raise up a host of faithful ambassadors to the destitute in our own land, and heralds of salvation to the perishing heathen? Sabbath Schools have been, and are now, successfully labouring for the conversion of children and youth, that there may be many more pious young me prepared to receive an education, to qualify them for that holy office. In one of the English Reports, it is said, that nineteen twentieths of those who have gone to heathen lands, became pious in Sabbath Schools! Think of this! and of the five or six hundred millions who will be in eternity, when this generation is in the grave. But I need not speak of the intellectual, moral, or religious influence of Sabbath Schools. You all realize, in a greater or less degree, the intellectual influence that must be exerted by the five million publications which the Sabbath School Union has, in less than four years, sent into different parts of the United States. You all know that many precious youth have been guarded against the enticing allurements of the most degrading vices, by Sabbath School. You have heard, too, of many revivals of religion, which have commenced in these nurseries of early piety, that have brought many hardened parents and grandparents into the fold of Jesus." Mr. Bullard ‎[sic]‎ then proceeded to enumerate some of the responsible duties that devolve on Sabbath School Teachers.--"First, Increase the number of scholars; this can be easily be done. In Andover, where, a year last summer, there were only 225 scholars, in consequence of the teachers visiting every family, and reporting to the Superintendent the name of every child of suitable age to attend a Sabbath School, there have been more than six hundred the last season. In another place, by a little effort, a week last Sabbath, after the services of the sanctuary, more than two hundred over fourteen years of age, organized themselves into classes, and chose their teachers. The second duty of teachers is, to obtain the affection of their classes. I should tremble to meet a child in eternity who had left my class, and the Sabbath School, unless I had made every possible exertion to win its affections, and prepare it for heaven. The last duty I would this evening urge upon you, is that of labouring diligently for the immediate salvation of the souls of your scholars. Here is an alarming deficiency among teachers. Many feel that, if they store the mind with truth; and keep children from mischief, they have nothing more to do, but wait and see if the seed thus sown, will not, some twenty or thirty years hence, spring up and bear fruit unto holiness; they think their children too young to be renewed in heart; but we have indubitable evidence that children are converted at the early age of five or six; I have seen a child of this age, within a few weeks, who has frequently during the past summer, awakened ‎[sic]‎ his parents in the night, weeping because he had such a wicked heart; nor would he be pacified, till they had knelt by his side, and prayed to God to give him a new one. He now gives good evidence of having passed from death to life. Indeed childhood and youth is the best possible time in the life of man, to make efforts for the salvation of the soul; FEEL this every Sabbath; feel as you would if you know that Jesus was present, witnessing the manner in which instruction is given, and the fervency with which your prayers are offered on the Sabbath, and during the week; remember that you must meet Him and your children at the judgment. And Oh! let me entreat you to spare yourselves the remorse that must take hold upon your souls, if you should there find that they perish though your neglect. Let teachers without an interest in the Redeemer, tremble lest they sink under the accumulated guilt of destroying themselves, and their scholars; the way to avoid this, is by becoming devoted, faithful Christians; for if you leave your classes, you are then to give an account for the opportunity you have had of saving their souls. Let all then resolve that they will consecrate themselves to their Saviour, and pray and labour earnestly for the immediate conversion of their scholars."
Event Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 748
Marriage Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 750
Marriage Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 750
Marriage Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 750
Occupation Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 748
Event First through Tenth Annual Reports of the Massachusetts Sabbath School Society
Publication: 1833-1842 Boston
Citation Details:  Pg. 75
Event Seventeenth through Thirty-second Annual Reports of the American Seaman's Friend Society
Publication: 1845-1860
Citation Details:  Pg. 23
Number of Children Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 750
Ordination Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 748
Event Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 748-749
Event A Genealogical Sketch of Dr. Artemas Bullard of Sutton, and His Descendants
Publication: Lucius P. Goddard 425 Main Street Worcester, MA 1878
Citation Details:  Pg. 14
Event Biographical Record of the Alumni of Amherst College During Its First Half Century, Volume 1
Publication: Amherst, MA 1883
Citation Details:  Pg. 27
Event Report of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, Volumes 53-59
Publication: 1838-1842
Citation Details:  1838, Pg. 51
Event Report of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, Volumes 53-59
Publication: 1838-1842
Citation Details:  1838, Pg. 11; 1840, Pg. 11
Occupation Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 749
Occupation A Genealogical Sketch of Dr. Artemas Bullard of Sutton, and His Descendants
Publication: Lucius P. Goddard 425 Main Street Worcester, MA 1878
Citation Details:  Pg. 14
  Text: pastor of the first Presbyterian church in St. Louis
Occupation Biographical Record of the Alumni of Amherst College During Its First Half Century, Volume 1
Publication: Amherst, MA 1883
Citation Details:  Pg. 27
Event Report of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, Volumes 53-59
Publication: 1838-1842
Citation Details:  1840, Pg. 5; 1841, Pg. 5 1842, Pg. 6
Event Report of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, Volumes 49-51
Publication: 1858-1860
Citation Details:  Pg. 172
Graduation Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 749
Graduation Biographical Record of the Alumni of Amherst College During Its First Half Century, Volume 1
Publication: Amherst, MA 1883
Citation Details:  Pg. 27
Event A Genealogical Sketch of Dr. Artemas Bullard of Sutton, and His Descendants
Publication: Lucius P. Goddard 425 Main Street Worcester, MA 1878
Citation Details:  Pg. 14
Event Biographical Record of the Alumni of Amherst College During Its First Half Century, Volume 1
Publication: Amherst, MA 1883
Citation Details:  Pg. 27
Occupation ProQuest Historical Newspapers - The New York Times
  Date of entry in original source: 12 October 1853
  Text: 06 OCT 1853
Rev. Dr. BULLARD presented a report on the China Mission.

‎[...]‎

06 OCT 1853
Rev. Dr. BULLARD said that, while there was so much rejoicing at the success of the Board, he was much depressed. He had viewed with intense interest the progress of the country. The thought that oppressed him was, that there was such an energy and activity in worldly business, while the American Board progressed so slowly. To meet the demand the next year, we need a million of dollars, and a hundred young men to send out. A young man connected with his church, a few years since had not a dollar of his own, but now he is connected with a firm whose monthly income is a million. He called on him a short time since for a subscription to a college, and he stated that he was then under obligations for contributions to the amount of fifty thousand dollars, and could only give two thousand then, but before the end of the year would contribute ten thousand for the same object.
Death Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 750
  Text: Dr. Bullard's death was identified with a scene of deep tragical interest. The Pacific Rail Road, in which St. Louis was deeply interested, was to be opened, on Thursday, November 1, 1855, to Jefferson City, the capital of the State. The occasion was a most exciting one. A long train of cars, bearing the Directors of the road and a large number of highly respectable citizens, set out on the excursion. The occasion was graced by military array, and martial music, and whatever else could render the scene imposing and joyous. In passing the bridge across the Gasconade, eighty-eight miles from St. Louis, and thirty-seven from Jefferson City, the structure gave way, and six cars, densely filled with human beings, fell one upon another, to the beach, thirty feet below. Twenty-nine persons were instantly killed, and among them Dr. Billiard. His remains did not reach St. Louis till Saturday night; and then they were taken, not to his residence, but to the church, where, on Monday, the Funeral solemnities took place. The Sabbath previous, he had administered the Lord's Supper, from the very table on which his lifeless body then lay. The church had been dedicated just two weeks before, but he had never preached in it. His Funeral Sermon was preached by the Rev, Timothy Hill, of Fairmount Church, St. Louis.
Death ProQuest Historical Newspapers - The New York Times
  Date of entry in original source: 5 November 1855
  Text: The Pacific Railroad Accident.
Full Particulars of the Disaster.
List of the Killed and Wounded.

From the St. Louis Republican, Nov. 2.

The magnificent train of cards which left our city yesterday morning, on an excursion to Jefferson City, to celebrate the opening of the Pacific Railroad to that place, is now a mass of ruins, and infinitely worse than this, many of the noble hearts that participated in the pride of the occasion, are now stilled in death.

The train consisting of fourteen cars, left the depot on Seventh-street, at 9 o'clock, crowded with invited guests, a half hour after the time advertised. by the time it reached Hermann this delay was fully recovered, thus showing the good conditino ot the track. After leaving Hermann, the train proceeded with good speed, and without the least difficulty until it reached the Gasconade, when one of the most disastrous accidents occurred which has yet thrown this city inot mourning.

The bridge across that stream gave way, and ten of the cars were prcipitated a distance of twenty-five or thirty feet. The locomotive from all appearances, had reached the edge of the first pier, when the structure gave way, and in falling reversed its position entirely, the frotn turnign to the east, and the wheels upward. On the locomotive at the time, were the President, Mr. H.E. BRIDGE, Mr. O'SULLIVAN, the Chief Engineer of the road, and and additional number of employees ‎[sic]‎.

Mr. BRIDGE, it is supposed, is the only one saved of the individuals named. An hour after this disaster, voices from beneath the wreck of the locomotive were heard asking for asistance, and when we left eh scene of the disaster active efforst were making to relieve the sufferers. It is possible--nay, it is to be hoped probably, that some of these unfortunates may have been rescued.

The road enters the bridge with a curve, and this circumstance, perhaps, prevented the disaster from being more fatal, as the cars thereby wre diverted, and thus prevented from falling directly in a general melee. Enough of injury, however, weas accomplished. The baggage car, next the engine, went down, to use the expression of one who as in it, "extremely easy," without ‎[sic]‎ causing any serious casualty. The first and second passenger cars followed, and in these several were killed, and a great number more or less mangled.

In the third car, one or two were killed, only. This car, although in a dangerous position, and almost entirely demolishsed, was less fatal to life and limb. In the fourth and fifth cards a great many were fatally injured, and several instantly killed. The balance of the train followed swiftly on their fatal errand, and the loss of life, with contusions more of less severe, was dreadful.

Some of the cars plunged on those beneath them with their ponderous wheels, and crushed or maimed the unfortunate persons below. Others hung upon the cliff in a perpendicular position, and two or three turned bottom upward down the grade. One one--the extreme rear car--maintained its position on the rail.

The following is a list of the killed and wounded, as far as could be ascertained, when the train, detailed for the purpose of bringing the injured to this city, left the scene of the disaster. Many others, less seriously hurt, were in the cars, but it is not necessary to name them.

DEAD.--‎[...]‎ Rev. Dr. Bullard

‎[...]‎

Doctors McDOWELL and McPHERSON were fortunately among the guests, and gave their best skill to the alleviation of the wretched sufferers. It was impossible, however, for them to apply bandages and reset limbs, under the circumstances. The accident occurred where no houses are to be seen--in a wild forest--and during the time a heavy storm or rain, accompanied by lightning and thunder, of the most vivid description, fell without intermission.

Couriers were dispatched forthwith to Hermann for another train, and in an hour, or less, the wounded were in comfortable cars on their way to the city. It was an awful spectacle--one that might appall ‎[sic]‎ the stoutest heart; the dead and dying lying without shelter, save that afforded by the hand of friendship or philanthropy, exposed to a pitiless storm, and the wounded groaning from amid the ruins, and supplicating the succor of the more fortunate.

The return cars reached the depots on Fourteenth and Seventh streets about 11 1/2 o'clock. They were filled with the wounded, and although their accommodations were limited, we heard not a single expression of dissatisfaction. Many in that melancholy train were fatally injured, and many suffered with intense agony; but they bore up like men, and exhibited the highest degree of fortitude.

We suppose that not one man out of ten escaped without injury to a greater or less extent, and although this may be termed a sever casualty of no ordinary character, yet it is wonderful how so many escaped with life.

Judge WELLS, of the District Court of the United States, was along with his lady. The Judge received a slight contusion or bruise, and Mrs. W. escaped entirely. One other lady was also in the company, and she, too, escaped.

Thus has happened a frightful accident--one more disastrous than it has been our sad duty to announce for a while. The city is in mourning for many of its most worthy citizens, and domestic grief will require long years to heal the wounds it has inflicted.
Event Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 750

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Family with Parents
Father
Artemas Bullard MD ‎(I5675)‎
Birth 8 December 1768 38 Holliston, Middlesex, Massachusetts, USA
Death 6 May 1842 ‎(Age 73)‎ Sutton, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
9 years
Mother
 
Lucy White ‎(I5987)‎
Birth 5 May 1778 Northbridge, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
Death 15 December 1869 ‎(Age 91)‎ Worcester, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA

Marriage: 6 December 1798
14 months
#1
Sister (Birth)
Maria Waters Bullard ‎(I5988)‎
Birth 25 January 1800 31 21 Northbridge, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
2 years
#2
(Birth)
Rev Artemas Bullard DD ‎(I5990)‎
Birth 3 June 1802 33 24 Northbridge, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
Death 1 November 1855 ‎(Age 53)‎ Missouri, USA
2 years
#3
Brother (Birth)
Rev Asa Bullard ‎(I5991)‎
Birth 26 March 1804 35 25 Northbridge, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
Death 1888 ‎(Age 83)‎ Massachusetts, USA
3 years
#4
Brother (Birth)
Joseph Bullard ‎(I5992)‎
Birth 30 October 1806 37 28 Sutton, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
Death 12 September 1872 ‎(Age 65)‎
3 years
#5
Sister (Birth)
Lucy Ann Bullard ‎(I5934)‎
Birth 9 November 1809 40 31 Sutton, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
Death 15 August 1898 ‎(Age 88)‎
#6
Brother (Birth)
Rev Ebenezer Waters Bullard ‎(I5993)‎
Birth 9 November 1809 40 31 Sutton, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
3 years
#7
Sister
Eunice White Bullard ‎(I5676)‎
Birth 26 August 1812 43 34 Sutton, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
3 years
#8
Brother (Birth)
Talbut Bullard MD ‎(I5994)‎
Birth 16 August 1815 46 37 Sutton, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
Death 18 June 1863 ‎(Age 47)‎ Indianapolis, Marion, Indiana, USA
3 years
#9
Brother (Birth)
Jesse Mason Bullard MD ‎(I5995)‎
Birth 12 November 1818 49 40 Sutton, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
Death 3 February 1851 ‎(Age 32)‎ San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA
3 years
#10
Brother (Birth)
Oliver Crosby "O.C." Bullard ‎(I5996)‎
Birth 20 January 1822 53 43 Sutton, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
Death 25 October 1890 ‎(Age 68)‎ Bridgeport, Fairfield, Connecticut, USA
Family with Anne Tuttle
Rev Artemas Bullard DD ‎(I5990)‎
Birth 3 June 1802 33 24 Northbridge, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
Death 1 November 1855 ‎(Age 53)‎ Missouri, USA
Wife

Marriage: 2 June 1829 -- Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA
14 months
#1
Son (Birth)
Artemas Everett Bullard ‎(I6703)‎
Birth 19 July 1830 28 Charlestown, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA
Death 13 April 1836 ‎(Age 5)‎ Cincinnati, Hamilton, Ohio, USA
2 years
#2
Daughter (Birth)
Anna Maria Bullard ‎(I6704)‎
Birth 19 July 1832 30 Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA
Death 28 April 1833 ‎(Age 9 months)‎
20 months
#3
Son (Birth)
Thomas Green Fessenden Bullard ‎(I6705)‎
Birth 21 March 1834 31 Cincinnati, Hamilton, Ohio, USA
Death November 1838 ‎(Age 4)‎
3 years
#4
Son (Birth)
Robert Leighton Bullard ‎(I6706)‎
Birth 21 March 1837 34 Cincinnati, Hamilton, Ohio, USA
Death 25 January 1848 ‎(Age 10)‎ St. Louis, Missouri, USA
3 years
#5
Son (Birth)
Rev Henry Bullard ‎(I6707)‎
Birth 23 September 1839 37 St. Louis, Missouri, USA
3 years
#6
Daughter (Birth)
Anna Elizabeth Bullard ‎(I6714)‎
Birth 29 September 1842 40
Death 13 January 1848 ‎(Age 5)‎ St. Louis, Missouri, USA
2 years
#7
Son (Birth)
Edward Payson Bullard ‎(I6715)‎
Birth 19 January 1845 42
Death 12 January 1848 ‎(Age 2)‎ St. Louis, Missouri, USA