Anne Tuttle  ‎(I6645)‎
Given Names: Anne
Surname: Tuttle

Gender: FemaleFemale
      

Personal Facts and Details
Marriage 2 June 1829 Rev Artemas Bullard DD - Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA


Show Details Source: Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 750

Occupation 1852 Author - Sights and Scenes in Europe: A Series of Letters from England, France, Germany, Switzerland and Italy in 1850


Show Details Source: A Genealogical Sketch of Dr. Artemas Bullard of Sutton, and His Descendants
Publication: Lucius P. Goddard 425 Main Street Worcester, MA 1878
Citation Details:  Pg. 15
  Text: Sights and Scenes in Europe


Note: http://books.google.com/books?id=nxr8j7F7NA8C&printsec=frontcover&dq=bullard&lr=&as_brr=4&ei=rNMSTLbVKJW2ywTfutmdCg&cd=100#v=onepage&q&f=false
Civic Membership Massachusetts Sabbath School Society life member


Show Details Source: First through Tenth Annual Reports of the Massachusetts Sabbath School Society
Publication: 1833-1842 Boston
Citation Details:  Pg. 75

Civic Organization 1855 American Board for Commissioners for Foreign Missions honorary member


Show Details Source: Report of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, Volumes 49-51
Publication: 1858-1860
Citation Details:  Pg. 210

Residence 1878 St. Joseph, Buchanan, Missouri, USA

Address:
Residence of son Rev. Henry Bullard

Rev Henry Bullard  (I6707) - [Relationship Chart]


Show Details Source: A Genealogical Sketch of Dr. Artemas Bullard of Sutton, and His Descendants
Publication: Lucius P. Goddard 425 Main Street Worcester, MA 1878
Citation Details:  Pg. 15

Last Change 13 June 2010 - 19:41:06 - by: susan
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Parents Family  (F2198)
Samuel J. Tuttle
-
Anne Tuttle
-

Immediate Family  (F2178)
Rev Artemas Bullard DD
1802 - 1855
Artemas Everett Bullard
1830 - 1836
Anna Maria Bullard
1832 - 1833
Thomas Green Fessenden Bullard
1834 - 1838
Robert Leighton Bullard
1837 - 1848
Rev Henry Bullard
1839 -
Anna Elizabeth Bullard
1842 - 1848
Edward Payson Bullard
1845 - 1848


Notes
Sources
Marriage Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 750
Marriage Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 750
Marriage Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 750
Occupation A Genealogical Sketch of Dr. Artemas Bullard of Sutton, and His Descendants
Publication: Lucius P. Goddard 425 Main Street Worcester, MA 1878
Citation Details:  Pg. 15
  Text: Sights and Scenes in Europe
Event First through Tenth Annual Reports of the Massachusetts Sabbath School Society
Publication: 1833-1842 Boston
Citation Details:  Pg. 75
Event Report of the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, Volumes 49-51
Publication: 1858-1860
Citation Details:  Pg. 210
Death of spouse Annals of the American Pulpit, Volume IV
Publication: Robert Carter & Brothers 530 Broadway New York, NY 1859
Citation Details:  Pg. 750
  Text: Dr. Bullard's death was identified with a scene of deep tragical interest. The Pacific Rail Road, in which St. Louis was deeply interested, was to be opened, on Thursday, November 1, 1855, to Jefferson City, the capital of the State. The occasion was a most exciting one. A long train of cars, bearing the Directors of the road and a large number of highly respectable citizens, set out on the excursion. The occasion was graced by military array, and martial music, and whatever else could render the scene imposing and joyous. In passing the bridge across the Gasconade, eighty-eight miles from St. Louis, and thirty-seven from Jefferson City, the structure gave way, and six cars, densely filled with human beings, fell one upon another, to the beach, thirty feet below. Twenty-nine persons were instantly killed, and among them Dr. Billiard. His remains did not reach St. Louis till Saturday night; and then they were taken, not to his residence, but to the church, where, on Monday, the Funeral solemnities took place. The Sabbath previous, he had administered the Lord's Supper, from the very table on which his lifeless body then lay. The church had been dedicated just two weeks before, but he had never preached in it. His Funeral Sermon was preached by the Rev, Timothy Hill, of Fairmount Church, St. Louis.
Death of spouse ProQuest Historical Newspapers - The New York Times
  Date of entry in original source: 5 November 1855
  Text: The Pacific Railroad Accident.
Full Particulars of the Disaster.
List of the Killed and Wounded.

From the St. Louis Republican, Nov. 2.

The magnificent train of cards which left our city yesterday morning, on an excursion to Jefferson City, to celebrate the opening of the Pacific Railroad to that place, is now a mass of ruins, and infinitely worse than this, many of the noble hearts that participated in the pride of the occasion, are now stilled in death.

The train consisting of fourteen cars, left the depot on Seventh-street, at 9 o'clock, crowded with invited guests, a half hour after the time advertised. by the time it reached Hermann this delay was fully recovered, thus showing the good conditino ot the track. After leaving Hermann, the train proceeded with good speed, and without the least difficulty until it reached the Gasconade, when one of the most disastrous accidents occurred which has yet thrown this city inot mourning.

The bridge across that stream gave way, and ten of the cars were prcipitated a distance of twenty-five or thirty feet. The locomotive from all appearances, had reached the edge of the first pier, when the structure gave way, and in falling reversed its position entirely, the frotn turnign to the east, and the wheels upward. On the locomotive at the time, were the President, Mr. H.E. BRIDGE, Mr. O'SULLIVAN, the Chief Engineer of the road, and and additional number of employees ‎[sic]‎.

Mr. BRIDGE, it is supposed, is the only one saved of the individuals named. An hour after this disaster, voices from beneath the wreck of the locomotive were heard asking for asistance, and when we left eh scene of the disaster active efforst were making to relieve the sufferers. It is possible--nay, it is to be hoped probably, that some of these unfortunates may have been rescued.

The road enters the bridge with a curve, and this circumstance, perhaps, prevented the disaster from being more fatal, as the cars thereby wre diverted, and thus prevented from falling directly in a general melee. Enough of injury, however, weas accomplished. The baggage car, next the engine, went down, to use the expression of one who as in it, "extremely easy," without ‎[sic]‎ causing any serious casualty. The first and second passenger cars followed, and in these several were killed, and a great number more or less mangled.

In the third car, one or two were killed, only. This car, although in a dangerous position, and almost entirely demolishsed, was less fatal to life and limb. In the fourth and fifth cards a great many were fatally injured, and several instantly killed. The balance of the train followed swiftly on their fatal errand, and the loss of life, with contusions more of less severe, was dreadful.

Some of the cars plunged on those beneath them with their ponderous wheels, and crushed or maimed the unfortunate persons below. Others hung upon the cliff in a perpendicular position, and two or three turned bottom upward down the grade. One one--the extreme rear car--maintained its position on the rail.

The following is a list of the killed and wounded, as far as could be ascertained, when the train, detailed for the purpose of bringing the injured to this city, left the scene of the disaster. Many others, less seriously hurt, were in the cars, but it is not necessary to name them.

DEAD.--‎[...]‎ Rev. Dr. Bullard

‎[...]‎

Doctors McDOWELL and McPHERSON were fortunately among the guests, and gave their best skill to the alleviation of the wretched sufferers. It was impossible, however, for them to apply bandages and reset limbs, under the circumstances. The accident occurred where no houses are to be seen--in a wild forest--and during the time a heavy storm or rain, accompanied by lightning and thunder, of the most vivid description, fell without intermission.

Couriers were dispatched forthwith to Hermann for another train, and in an hour, or less, the wounded were in comfortable cars on their way to the city. It was an awful spectacle--one that might appall ‎[sic]‎ the stoutest heart; the dead and dying lying without shelter, save that afforded by the hand of friendship or philanthropy, exposed to a pitiless storm, and the wounded groaning from amid the ruins, and supplicating the succor of the more fortunate.

The return cars reached the depots on Fourteenth and Seventh streets about 11 1/2 o'clock. They were filled with the wounded, and although their accommodations were limited, we heard not a single expression of dissatisfaction. Many in that melancholy train were fatally injured, and many suffered with intense agony; but they bore up like men, and exhibited the highest degree of fortitude.

We suppose that not one man out of ten escaped without injury to a greater or less extent, and although this may be termed a sever casualty of no ordinary character, yet it is wonderful how so many escaped with life.

Judge WELLS, of the District Court of the United States, was along with his lady. The Judge received a slight contusion or bruise, and Mrs. W. escaped entirely. One other lady was also in the company, and she, too, escaped.

Thus has happened a frightful accident--one more disastrous than it has been our sad duty to announce for a while. The city is in mourning for many of its most worthy citizens, and domestic grief will require long years to heal the wounds it has inflicted.
Residence A Genealogical Sketch of Dr. Artemas Bullard of Sutton, and His Descendants
Publication: Lucius P. Goddard 425 Main Street Worcester, MA 1878
Citation Details:  Pg. 15

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Family with Parents
Father
#1
Family with Rev Artemas Bullard DD
Husband
Rev Artemas Bullard DD ‎(I5990)‎
Birth 3 June 1802 33 24 Northbridge, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA
Death 1 November 1855 ‎(Age 53)‎ Missouri, USA

Marriage: 2 June 1829 -- Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA
14 months
#1
Son (Birth)
Artemas Everett Bullard ‎(I6703)‎
Birth 19 July 1830 28 Charlestown, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA
Death 13 April 1836 ‎(Age 5)‎ Cincinnati, Hamilton, Ohio, USA
2 years
#2
Daughter (Birth)
Anna Maria Bullard ‎(I6704)‎
Birth 19 July 1832 30 Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, USA
Death 28 April 1833 ‎(Age 9 months)‎
20 months
#3
Son (Birth)
Thomas Green Fessenden Bullard ‎(I6705)‎
Birth 21 March 1834 31 Cincinnati, Hamilton, Ohio, USA
Death November 1838 ‎(Age 4)‎
3 years
#4
Son (Birth)
Robert Leighton Bullard ‎(I6706)‎
Birth 21 March 1837 34 Cincinnati, Hamilton, Ohio, USA
Death 25 January 1848 ‎(Age 10)‎ St. Louis, Missouri, USA
3 years
#5
Son (Birth)
Rev Henry Bullard ‎(I6707)‎
Birth 23 September 1839 37 St. Louis, Missouri, USA
3 years
#6
Daughter (Birth)
Anna Elizabeth Bullard ‎(I6714)‎
Birth 29 September 1842 40
Death 13 January 1848 ‎(Age 5)‎ St. Louis, Missouri, USA
2 years
#7
Son (Birth)
Edward Payson Bullard ‎(I6715)‎
Birth 19 January 1845 42
Death 12 January 1848 ‎(Age 2)‎ St. Louis, Missouri, USA